Tuesday, August 10, 2010

Everything the PRS does is for the artists, even having a yabba-dabba-do time

PRS collect all the money they can, and give it all to the artists, right?

PRS for Music and MCPS pay money collected to their writer, composer and music publisher members. Both organisations are ‘not for profit’ and only deduct a small administration/commission fee to cover operating costs.
Yes. They just deduct a small admin or commission fee, to cover operating costs. And who could begrudge them that?

A small commission, covering the costs of office space, collecting the money, contacting people with licence problems.

Oh... and creating totally spurious surveys:
Latest research undertaken by PRS for Music, reveals that The Flintstones’ theme tune is the most recognisable of kids’ television programmes, according to UK adults.

The survey of 2,000 adults across the UK, also show that Baa Baa Black Sheep is the nursery rhyme we remember most from our childhood, while up to 28% of females and 23% of males listen to music to make themselves feel younger.
Are you one of those artists who the PRS are so worried about not getting much money? Aren't you delighted that they're spending the little bit you do get finding out these things?

Why have you done this, PRS?
Commenting on the results, Ellis Rich, chairman of PRS, said: “Many of us find our first love for music as children through singing nursery rhymes and humming along to our favourite theme tunes on television. It is a truly wonderful sensation when the recollection of music can bring back those nostalgic emotions of how music made us feel as children; emotions and memories which continue to live on inside so many adults, still to this day”.
This seems to have an awful lot to do with getting the name of Ellis Rich (seriously? Rich?) into the papers, and nothing whatsoever to do with collecting and distributing royalties. It's not even a made-up survey worth making-up, to be honest.

1 comment:

Anonymous said...

As a business owner, I can completely see your point. I own an art gallery, so I know only too well of the importance of giving credit where credit is due.

Indeed I pay my licence fee happily knowing that it goes to their members, however I read pieces like this in the paper and ask myself - why?

But I can see another side to the story. For many years, I paid a PPL licence, however one day the PRS asked me for another licence. I thought it was a complete scam and dismissed it, until I read about them in the paper.

I think for me, reading about the PRS did help me realise that they were legit and I was more happy to pay my dues. So for their musicians - more people paying their licences just means more revenue.

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