Tuesday, March 07, 2006

WHEN FUTURISM HAS PASSED

New NumanGary Numan has got a new album out next week, which raises the question of what a futurist sounds like when their era has zoomed by. Without the appearance of electric friends or whatever. Apparently:

Co-produced with underground electronic artist DJ Ade Fenton "Jagged" is said to be an aggressive, forward-looking album which takes the best elements of his previous work and gives them an anthemic, contemporary twist.

We did read that as "anaemic" at first, which suggested he was going back to the white face powder.

What is amusing is he's on Cooking Vinyl in the UK now, which for us will always be The Texas Campfire Tapes people.


2 comments:

acb said...

He jumped on the goth bandwagon a few albums ago, with an album of industrial music themed on the death of God and the triumph of Lucifer or something. He's probably not the first aging synthpopper to realise that the rivethead crowd is where the money is; Kurt Wossname, of cyberpunk boyband Information Society, got in touch with his inner Trent Reznor sometime in the late 1990s, signed to US goth-by-numbers label Cleopatra and put out some albums, including one of the band's hits, rerecorded/remixed in a distressed industrial style. And then there was Steve Strange's "Visage 2.0" comeback, in which the no longer androgynous singer sang his 1980s hits over 1990s groovebox beats and guitars played by members of some goth band or other.

Anonymous said...

See also the lucrative Bauhaus reformation, the "nearly got it together" Cocteau Twins regrouping, and the laws-of-slowly-diminishing-returns that are The Mission, The Sisters Of Mercy, All About Eve, New Model Army etc...

What is it about the psychology of these bands and their fans that bond them together even after the level of quality and hair has receded to the point of almost total non-existance?

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