Saturday, July 07, 2007

Half an hour to go...

Jonathan Ross is interviewing Borrell who has just said, with a straight face:

"To tell you the truth, I never thought about it [climate change] in my life, then last year I saw An Inconvenient Truth..."

Why would someone who had never thought about climate change ever have gone to see An Inconvenient Truth?

Someone else is with Jonathan Ross, pointing out that:
"If you could harness the power of cynicism around this event, you could power the world."

The sting of this remark, though, is reduced by it being Jimmy Carr talking. Jimmy Carr. Attacking people for cynical sniping. It's like Brian Rix crying "it's nothing but a farce..."

Wembley, it has to be said, doesn't look to be crammed at the moment. Surely there wasn't plenty of room around the front of the stage twenty minutes before the start of Live Aid, was there?


3 comments:

Anonymous said...

He does have a point concerning the cynicism. People such as yourself have been bleating about the hypocrisy of performers flying to the concert, and the carbon footprint the event will leave - yet were you to apply that logic across the board, nobody would ever attend so much as a town hall meeting concerning climate change if they were forced to do anything other than walk to the venue.

simon h b said...

Well, yes, it's true that I've been bleating about it. But it could have been possible to do these gigs in a much more Earth-friendly way - for example, flying Kravitz and Gray to Brazil is pointless; Will I Am just told Jonathan Ross he was in Brazil two days ago - so why didn't he play Rio, rather than making a 7000 mile trip to play London?

You know how galling it is to watch a little film saying "don't put too much water in your kettle" from an event where the participants have clocked up a fifth of a million miles for no other reason than to play the gig?

Don't confuse people bleating realistically for people bleating cynically.

M.C. Glammer said...

It seems like the guy who once claimed to have invented the internet could've utilised global communications in more of a 'setting a good example' kind of way, which would've made for better TV than the 'mixed for a stadium, pumped into your living room' telegigathons that always fail to meet expectations. After all, the Beatles did the first globally transmitted gig from a TV studio 40 years ago.

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