Tuesday, November 18, 2008

Hope I retire before I get C-old-play

Oh, if only Chris Martin's musings on retirement formed some sort of legally binding contract:

"I'm 31 now and I don't think that bands should keep going past 33.
"I don't believe in time off. We've still got most of our hair, we can still fit into our musical trousers and we've got to make the most of that."

Given that Martin's dirges sound like they've been written for men of 50 by older, wiser heads, it's not immediately clear why he'd feel the need to disband as soon as he hit Jesus' age, but let's not discourage him.

Nor is it entirely clear what, if Martin doesn't believe in "time off", explains the paucity of achievement of the band - four albums in twelve years hardly speaks of too tight an embrace of the Protestant Work Ethic, does it?

Still, could someone put something in their diaries for 2010 to remind Martin of his pledge to give up? Thanks.


2 comments:

Anonymous said...

I'm so fed up of this bands shouldn't keep going after bla age attitude. Fair enough, a large number of recording artists do spend most of their career trying to repeat past successes or strive to retain the spirit of youth but doesn't Chris Martin have any sort of ambition? Can't he see that perhaps as one gets older one could use maturity and experience to their advantage, perhaps improve song-writing ability, learn more about music and the world, try to break some new ground. Or alternatively does he (and for that matter others who repeat this sort of statement) honestly believe that he's reached either the peak of his abilities or, worse, the pinnacle of what's possible in music with terrible, wretched pieces of nonsense like Fix You? Unfortunately I think he's probably going to still be putting out the same crap every couple of years for the foreseeable future. (I'll admit here that I actually quite enjoyed Parachutes and had hope the band could change into a nice pop song producing unit. I was wrong.)

simon h b said...

I suppose it is one of the follies of the young to believe that after a certain age the food in your mouth turns to dust and your desire to live wanes.

But he's 31. You'd have thought he'd have outgrown that anyway.

Also: you can perhaps see why a rockstar in the 1960s might assume that growing old might mean you'd lose traction in a teenage market; but in 2008, when you can see people like Johnny Cash having a glowing late-period, you'd think people would no longer think in those ways.

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