Sunday, October 02, 2016

Liam Gallagher calls for "mischief"

Liam Gallagher - or, since David Cameron's resignation honours, Baron Gallagher of Burnage - has called for more "mischief" from musicians:

Encouraging today's musicians to cause more mischief, Gallagher said: "There is no excuse for young bands to act like grown men. When you're older and have kids, cool it out a bit, but I get up to more mischief in my butcher’s than [they] do on their fucking tours. Maybe it's just where we're from."

He added: "I guess it goes back to the working-class thing. The shit-kickers aren’t breaking through. A lot of music these days is by middle-class kids."
That's right, a man who is so middle class he still visits a butchers is complaining about the lack of authentic working class voices.

He's doing this in a press junket to promote a film that dredges up the long-cold corpse of Oasis. You wonder, as you try to swim through all the attention this movie is getting, why young bands struggle to get their voices heard, don't you?

Sidenote: what fucking "mischief" does he get up to in his butcher's anyway? Asking how much the venison costs and then saying "that's quite dear?"

1 comment:

Robin Carmody said...

I know I've said this before, but while it is undoubtedly true that more people born to privilege have made pop music this century than before, a) that is the result of a change - the disappearance of Hyacinth Bucketism, basically - which the Left initially welcomed and certainly would have looked forward to and anticipated before it actually happened, and b) the working class has changed and broadened, and its pop presence reflects that.

Just as the working class as a whole is far less white, and far more diverse in its origins and backgrounds, than it once was, then the Dizzees and Tinies, those who really have crossed over and established a genuine pop presence, are really the natural successors of Liam & Robbie - who were part of a demographic which was declining even when they were at their height of tabloid ubiquity - and are every bit as legitimate as working-class pop icons and heroes.

Those who claim to be of the Left who refuse to accept them as such - generally the same people who think Corbyn has reignited working-class political engagement when in fact he has accelerated the long-term embourgeoisement of Labour activity - will get their own harsh judgement from me and, I trust, you; at best 'Menace of Beatlism'-ism regurgitated, with the Beatles themselves recast as brass bands, at worst open Mailites posing as Guardianistas. Certainly, they confirm that the Left has had a long-term problem with black pop, and black cultural expression which it can't control, which seems more offensive than the Right's open dismissal (because you don't expect anything better from the latter, in the same way that, even now, three decades after Maxwell got rid of everyone from Pilger to Waterhouse, it still feels worse if the Mirror prints something dodgy than if it's the Sun).

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